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Some religious charities receive more despite overall drop
Adelle M. Banks, Religion News Service
October 20, 2010
2 MIN READ TIME

Some religious charities receive more despite overall drop

Some religious charities receive more despite overall drop
Adelle M. Banks, Religion News Service
October 20, 2010

Several of the nation’s

largest religious charities reported increases in private support as nonprofits

overall saw decreases in donations last year, The Chronicle of Philanthropy

reported.

Feed the Children, which

ranked fifth in the annual Philanthropy 400, had a 1.2 percent increase in

private support, which totaled $1.19 billion. World Vision saw a 4.5 percent

increase in its private support, which totaled $870 million, giving it the No.

9 rank on the list.

Catholic Charities USA was

ranked third, with a 66 percent increase from the previous year — a figure that

the social service organization has questioned. According to the publication,

Catholic Charities’ private support totaled $1.28 billion.

“There’s a question about

the accuracy of the percentage of increase, and we’re talking with The

Chronicle of Philanthropy about it,” said Roger Conner, spokesman for Catholic

Charities USA.

Overall, donations to the

country’s largest charities dropped by 11 percent last year.

The Salvation Army, which

ranked second, saw a decrease of 8.4 percent in its private support, which

totaled $1.7 billion. Food for the Poor, which ranked sixth, had a 27.6 percent

drop in private donations, which totaled $1.07 billion.

Other religious

organizations in the top 25 included:

  • Habitat for Humanity

    International, 3.8 percent decrease

  • Operation Blessing

    International, 16.4 percent increase

  • Campus Crusade for Christ,

    2.3 percent decrease.

The publication bases its

rankings on charities’ reports of cash and other gifts received from private

sources.